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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> but it's made bill o'reilly take the position that christianity is not a religion. >> that's awesome >> bill: in what sense. >> o'reilly said a christmas tree but it's a sort of a christmas symbol but christianity is not a religion. it's a philosophy. >> really? >> he actually said this. if you don't understand that christianity is not a religion you are a dummy. it was almost like o'reilly was channelling stephen colbert like a drunk stephen colbert. if you haven't caught that segment, it was breath-taking. >> bill: it came up to me again. we had our white house correspondents association, the first party of the year first christmas party, wasn't even in december. they had it on the 29th of november. and so, you know it was awkward because i walked in, and i said like, merry christmas to somebody. and they said, happy holidays. and then i said happy holidays to somebody and they said, no, you can say merry christmas to me. i am thinking jesus. get off. careful here. >> happeny holidays? they are judging you? you know, the war on christmas thing,
holiday trees instead. >> i am going to guess father john religion contributor has thoughts on this. >> am i angry, am i upset? >> i am not feeling angry from you. >> the reason i am not angry is? th that yes, i think it's silly. it's out of place for people to dedicate so much energy to try to get rid of christmas scenes like this. the good news is when christianity has been persecuted, when it has been outlawed, when people have died for their faith, it hasn't gone away. everybody has an opportunity to make sure their faith does not go away in this christmas season. to live that faith as a family, as a community. what should we do about these i think very small percentage of people who are working to try to get rid of these public expressions of faith? i think we should speak up. that's why i am doing it. that's why i think it's important we have these stories to show what they are trying to do without losing the peace. if our christmas is going to be all about getting a upset at people trying to take away christmas that's silly too. >>s are mu rasmussen did a poll how people say happy h
in any way is an establishment of religion. there is no officially supported secretary or denomination in the manner, this is not in any way an endorsement of any particular religion or any religious denomination. in short the first amendment as originally written had nothing to do with the city sign. indeed, for the first 175 years of our constitutional history, no one would have read the first amendment in this way. they would have -- any way that would have prevented this seal or sign. mr. speaker, in this very room in which i stand, this very chamber, right over my right-hand shoulder is a sign that says in god we trust. the rotunda in the capitol, a chapel that's been in use since 1955 as a place where members go to pray for divine guidance in debating the issues of the day. a stained glass window there shows president george washington kneeling in prayer and the words of saum 16:1 surround him, preserve me, o god, for in thee i put my trust. and the holy bible rests on that altar. i'll grant you, the first amendment has been badly interpreted by the u.s. supreme court, and the 10
religion you make of the situation in egypt and the dangers it could turn into an islamist state? >> the bottom line in egypt is it's bad for the egyptian in their political future. probably not as bad for the long-term interests of the united states. anytime a leader like morsi puts himself above the judiciary, that's not a good sign to democracy. anytime you put that language in there, it's not good for their democracy. it's troubling not only for egypt but for the long-term events in syria where things are more polarised because of the violence there and the possibility of an islamist state there. but the more encouraging news is the brotherhood has shown they can behave a little more. >> the brotherhood of which morsi was a member of. >> and when he first came in they called to ban alcohol but they didn't because of tourist dollars. and to segregate beaches and they didn't do it bus they were concerned about the economic realities. they need western aid. and the the gaza conflict. they behaved responsibly and tried to bring things to a conclusion. there is evidence that while
on the street say it doesn't provide enough guarantees for women's rights or minority religions. what do you make of the situation, in egypt and the dangers that it could turn into an islamic state. >> the bottom line in egypt, it is bad for egyptians and their political future, and perhaps not quite as bad for the long term national security interests of the united states, any time a leader of a country like morsi puts himself above the judiciary it is not a good sign for democracy and when you run through a constitution with language that could lead to islamist interpretation, that is not good for their democracy. and it is particularly troubling, not only for egypt, but, for the long term course of events in syria, and things are extraordinarily polarized and a possibility of an islamist state there. but the more encouraging news, the brotherhood has shown they can -- >> the muslim brotherhood of which he was a member. >> there were calls to ban alcohol and they didn't do it, why? because they cared about tourist dollars and, changing women wear on the beaches and they were concerned abou
you bought a product manufactured in egypt. beyond the religion except for the real he can realists, what the poor of egypt want is a job. they want economic improvements and morsi knows he can't deliver on a reasonable time frame so he's ramming through this constitution hell for leather because he can do it now and wouldn't be able to do it later. bill: i was surprised 100,000 people came back into the streets. that's a strong statement against what he is doing. but the implications for that entire region, if egypt continues along this path are enormous. he fled the palace yesterday. that was the word that was used. whether he just went home for the night. but you say an arab culture, that's a big deal. why? >> he's perceived as having fled. demonstrators feel they drove him out an left in a panic. this is a macho surface effects culture. egypt remains the pivotal arab country. so the future of egypt is even more important than syria. so i'm concerned about real violence in the streets. the muslim brotherhood is extremely well organized. and the key question is how will the securi
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)